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✨ “Take it easy driving – the life you save may be mine.”
― James Dean
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I write this blog on behalf of my husband, Dave Clarkson, who supplies me with all the technical specs, info and interesting stories! Feel free to contact him on his cellphone at +27 60 637 2560.


Saturday, 3 January 2015

1956 Ferguson Vaaljapie TE-F 20 #1

HANDLING NOTES for the FERGUSON TE-F 20 Tractor (Vaaljapie) 


The Ferguson TE20 is an agricultural tractor designed by Harry Ferguson. By far his most successful design, it was manufactured from 1946 until 1956, and was commonly known as the Little Grey Fergie. It is light-weight but effective, and a popular collector's item for enthusiasts today. 

Harry Ferguson was born in Ireland in 1884 and at the age of 14 became an apprentice at a car and cycle shop in Belfast owned by his elder brother Joe. This was the beginning of his interest in all things mechanical, including aeroplanes.

He then established his own business selling various makes of cars, took an agency to sell Waterloo Boy model N tractors (the Overtime), and in 1917 the Irish government asked him to tour Ireland to help improve Ireland's tractors - the rest is now history.



HANDLING NOTES for the FERGUSON TE-F 20 Tractor (Vaaljapie)

The following notes have been compiled to assist you to obtain maximum service from your tractor by avoiding inadvertent damage.

CLUTCH OPERATION
Use the clutch only when selecting the gear ratio to be used or to engage or disengage P.T.O. drive. If the load on the engine is goo great for the gear in use, always stop and select a lower gear. Never slip the clutch in order to increase engine speed. Never attempt to change gear when the tractor is in motion. Avoid resting the left foot on the clutch pedal, as this may cause the clutch to slip.

POWER TAKE-OFF SHAFT
The shaft projects from the centre of the rear axle and is enclosed by a removable cap. The operating lever for the P.T.O. clutch is mounted in the left-hand inspection cover of the centre axle housing, as shown in Fig. 5. Movement of the lever towards the rear engages the drive. Engine clutch must be depressed to engage or disengage the P.T.O. drive. Do not run with the drive constantly engaged when the Power Take-Off or Hydraulic Mechanism is not being used.


HYDRAULIC LIFT
As the hydraulic pump is driven by the P.T.O. shaft, the latter must be engaged before the hydraulic system can operate. The hydraulic control lever is situated at the driver's right-hand, as shown in Fig. 2. Rear-ward movement of this lever raises the hydraulic linkage, forward movement releases the hydraulic pressure, allowing the implement to fall. When an implement is in work, the depth at which it operates is governed by the distance that the control lever is moved forward, and an adjustable stop, fitted to the control lever quadrant, ensures that the lever is moved to the same position each time the implement enters work.

The pump has external delivery points for use with implements which incorporate remote pressure operated hydraulic systems, such as the Ferguson High Lift Loader. Before removing plugs (see Fig 5), to connect up implement, make sure the pump is disengaged.

HYDRAULIC PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE
Avoid using the tractor hydraulic system in any way which causes the pressure relief valve, which is internal, to discharge continually. Although this will not actually damage the system, it may cause a slight reduction in the maximum operating pressure.

Where, on later tractors, the Relief Valve is fitted in the lift cover, it is constructed so that, when it opens, all the working parts are lubricated and submerged in the discharged oil, it is therefore desirable for the Relief Valve to be discharged at regular intervals. This can best be effected by an occasional short attempt to raise a load on the lower links greater than the system is capable of lifting.

The maximum recommended load for normal work on all tractors is 1000lbs (453.6kg) a the point of implement attachment on the lower links, and this figure should not otherwise e exceeded.
Warning : Adjustment and inspection of the Relief Valve must be strictly entrusted to an authorised service engineer; unskilled attention to this assembly may result in serious damage to the Hydraulic System.


KEY TO ANNOTATION
A. OPERATING LEVER - P.T.O. CLUTCH
B. DIPSTICK - TRANSMISSION OIL
C. HYDRAULIC SYSTEM RELIEF VALVE
D. GREASE NIPPLE - INDEPENDANT BRAKE SHAFT
E & F. HYDRAULIC PUMP DELIVERY POINTS
G. STARTER SWITCH SAFETY BUTTON

SAFETY DEVICE
A safety device has been incorporated in the design of the hydraulic system to protect the implement if a hidden obstruction is struck. In this event, the sudden impact has the immediate effect of relieving the effective weight of the implement from the tractor rear wheels, which thereby lose traction and the tractor stops with the rear wheels spinning, without damage to the implement. The tractor can be reversed and the implement raised, then the tractor moved forward before lowering the implement at a point beyond the obstruction.


KEY TO ANNOTATION
A. LOWER LINKS
B. CHECK CHAINS
C. CHAIN ANCHORS
D. TOP LINK CONNECTION
E. CONTROL SPRING
F. CIRCULAR GROOVE
G. P.T.O. CAP
H. LEVELLING LEVER
J. UPPER LINK ASSEMBLY

LINKAGE TOP LINK CONNECTION
Do not in any circumstances attempt to pull or tow directly from the top link connection or to alter the setting of the main control spring located behind the driver's seat.

On later tractors, adjustment of the upper link assembly is obtained by locating the centre bolt in different pairs of holes in the two members - by this means, the length can be raised between 24½" (622mm) and 26½" (672mm). The shortest adjustment should only be used with certain implements and, in such cases, a precise recommendation will be made.

LOWER LINKS
Remember when coupling implements to the lower links, always fir the left side first and use the levelling lever to assist in fitting the right side. The check chains prevent the implement from swinging side-ways into the rear wheels. It is particularly important that these chains are not twisted and that the chain anchors are assembled correctly with the chain attached above the centre as shown in Fig 6.

The right-hand lift rod is marked by a circular groove, which, when level with the top of the fork into which it threads, indicates that both lower links are level.

ADJUSTABLE DRAWBAR
Normal setting is 18'' (457mm) between drawbar and ground when the lower links are horizontal and the notches in the stays are in line. the height range is between 10'' (254mm) and 23'' (584mm) above ground.

By raising the drawbar, i.e. shortening the stays, traction is increased with trailed machinery. Lowering the drawbar will tend to keep the front end of the tractor down at the expense of some loss of traction.
The height adjustment is particularly useful when working with trailers with high turntables, e.g. four-wheel horse wagon conversions. By raising the drawbar, strain on the turntable is reduced and the line of draft is improved.


When the drawbar is fitted, as shown above, ensure that the hydraulic control lever is locked in the fully forward position by means of the Safety Stop, as shown below :


and that the pump gear is disengaged when the hydraulic mechanism or power take-off is not being used.

When the drawbar is in continuous use, there is a possibility that the working parts of the hydraulic system may become stiff through lack of use. To avoid this, disconnect the drawbar each day and, by operating the hydraulic control lever, raise and lower the linkage several times.

USE OF BREAKS
The combined brake pedal operates the brakes on both rear wheels. Earlier tractors are fitted with a ratchet for parking and later tractors have a brake parking latch.

When the parking latch lever is set forward, the brake pedal is locked down in the position established by the next pressure of the operator's foot and cannot be released until the lever is moved to the rear. Moving the lever forward does not in itself lock the pedal; it ensures, however, that when next the brakes are applied, they remain ''on''.


The independent brake pedals, which are for assisting reduction of the turning circle and operate the brake on the appropriate when only, should never be applied when travelling at high speed, as this can cause excessive stress.

Always keep the brakes in a good state of adjustment. Unbalanced or slackly adjusted brakes can be dangerous and, if binding, will cause rapid lining wear and excessive fuel consumption.


Keep an eye open for the next episode - OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS for the FERGUSON TE-F 20 Tractor (Vaaljapie)

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